Blanchard & Walker Weekly

Topic of the Week  5 Laws Ruth Bader Ginsburg Championed to Support Gender Equality

Ruth Bader Ginsburg dedicated her career to ensuring that marginalized groups received justice and was known for tactfully dissenting in court.

"Fight for the things that you care about, but do it in a way that will lead others to join you,” she said. Here’s a list of five laws Ginsburg helped pass to achieve gender equality in the US. 

-Global Citizen

1. Employers cannot discriminate against employees based on gender or reproductive choices.

ACLU Women’s Rights Project attorney Susan Deller Ross and Ginsburg pushed to have pregnancy discrimination recognized as a form of sex discrimination. The pair is credited for helping pass the Pregnancy Discrimination Act, an amendment to Title VII in 1978 which acknowledges pregnancy discrimination as unlawful. Women are now more protected against getting fired, or not considered for a job because they are pregnant or have plans to get pregnant. 

2. State-funded schools must admit women.

In 1996, Ginsburg led the ruling decision in the United States v. Virginia case. Until then, women had been prohibited from attending the Virginia Military Institute. Ginsburg argued that rather than create a separate women’s program, they should be allowed to join the same program as men.

3. Women have the right to financial independence and equal benefits.

Ginsburg’s work paved the way for the Equal Credit Opportunity Act, which passed in1974 and allowed women to apply for bank accounts, credit cards, and mortgages without a male co-signer. She also helped ensure that women could receive the same military housing allowances as men, and women are no longer required to pay more for pension plans than men to receive the same benefits, according to the ACLU.

“Feminism [is the] notion that we should each be free to develop our own talents and not be held back by man made barriers,” Ginsburg said in her 2016 book “My Own Words.”

4. Men are entitled to the same caregiving and Social Security rights as women.

Throughout her career, Ginsburg stressed how gender equality benefits both men and women. 

In 1968, Ginsburg represented Charles Moritz, a man who had never been married and claimed a tax deduction for caring for his mother, according to Smithsonian Magazine. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) denied his deduction because he was a man and unmarried. The US Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit ruled that the IRS had violated the Equal Protection Clause of the US Constitution and in 1971 Section 214 of the IRS Code was amended to allow individuals to claim caregiving deductions, regardless of sex.

5. Juries must include women.

Up until 1979, jury duty was considered optional for women in the US. Several states argued that women should be exempt from participating due to family and household obligations. Ginsburg fought to require women to serve on juries on the basis that their civic duty should be valued the same as men’s. 

"Women belong in all places where decisions are being made,” Ginsburg told USA Today in 2009. “It shouldn't be that women are the exception.”

Thought of the Week

"I would like to be remembered as someone who used whatever talent she had to do her work to the very best of her ability."

–Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Weekly Comic by Jerry King

Weekly Comic by Jerry King

Blog of the Week

Top Five News Headlines

    List of the Week

    from CNN

    Ruth Bader Ginsburg Fast Facts

    Timeline To Justice

    • 1959-1961 - Law clerk to a judge in the US District Court, Southern District of New York.
    • 1961-1963 - Research associate and associate director, Project of International Procedure at Columbia Law School.
    • 1963-1972 - Professor at Rutgers University School of Law.
    • 1972-1980 - Professor at Columbia University School of Law. She is the first woman to be hired with tenure at Columbia University School of Law.
    • 1973-1980 - General counsel for the ACLU.
    • 1977-1978 - Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in Behavioral Sciences, Stanford, California.
    • 1980-1993 - Judge of the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit.
    • August 10, 1993 - Is sworn in as Supreme Court justice filling the seat held by Justice Byron White.

    Archive

    FROM THE BLOG
    • Working off the Clock – Alro Steel FLSA Overtime Pay Lawsuit May 30, 2022

      Federal Court Orders Notice to Alro Steel Employees in Nationwide Overtime Lawsuit

      Blanchard & Walker sent the court approved notice to 2500+ Alro Steel employees who may have a right to seek recover for off-the-clock uncompensated time at Alro Steel facilities throughout the country. Federal District Court Judge Murphy for the Eastern District of Michigan, granted conditional certification and ordered notice of FLSA rights to opt-in for current and former warehouse employees of Alro Steel Corporation. (more…)

    • The End of Forced Arbitration for Survivors of Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment March 8, 2022

      On March 3, 2022, President Biden signed the Ending Forced Arbitration of Sexual Assault & Sexual Harassment Act. This law is one significant step forward in the fight to end arbitration contracts that deny access to the Courts for violations of fundamental workplace rights.

      For far too long, countless survivors, workers, and consumers have been silenced by forced arbitration. (more…)

    • MICHIGAN UNEMPLOYMENT OVERPAYMENT WAIVERS? FAQ’s: WHAT WE KNOW (AND WHAT WE DON’T) February 11, 2022

      News Update: Promised Waivers fall short.  According to recent reporting, the waiver program was much smaller than promised.  Although waivers for 55,000 more claimants is a good step forward, it fell short of the 382,000 promised and as of May 12, 2022 there is still no explanation about when or if more will be coming.

      (more…)